Sudan Police Fire Tear Gas As Thousands Protest

Sudan Police Fire Tear Gas As Thousands Protest
Protesters on Monday
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The police in Sudan on Monday fired tear gas as thousands of protesters rallied against the military-dominated government near the presidential palace in Khartoum, witnesses told reporters.

Africa Daily News, New York reports that an official and medics said close to 50 people had been killed in a outburst of tribal violence.

The Khartoum demonstrators marched from various districts of the capital, many carrying national flags or chanting, ‘No to military rule‘ and, ‘The army might betray you, but the street will never betray you.’

Protesters, in the latest of many rallies in recent weeks, set up road barricades with rocks and burning car tyres, the black smoke billowing into the sky.

Read Also: Sudan’s Military Leader Appeals For UN Support

Following an October 25 coup, previous protests were met by a violent crackdown that left 44 people killed up to November 22, a pro-democracy doctors’ union said. Hundreds more were wounded, mostly by bullets.

Sudan’s top general, Abdel Fattah al-Burhan, seized power and detained Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok but, after international condemnation and mass protests, reinstated him in a deal signed on November 21.

Critics lambasted the agreement and pro-democracy activists vowed to maintain pressure on the military-civilian authority.

‘Mr Hamdok betrayed the roadmap” of the transition, said Mahmoud Abidine, demonstrating in the centre of Khartoum.

‘What happened is a typical example of a military coup d’etat because it was followed by arrests, killings in the street, and against it are only young people asking for freedom, democracy and a civilian regime,’ he said.

The top general has long insisted the military’s move was ‘not a coup’ but a step ‘to rectify the transition’ towards full democracy that started with the 2019 ouster of autocratic president Omar al-Bashir.

AFRICA DAILY NEWS, NEW YORK

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