Over N500 Million In Unpaid Debt In Niger State, According To NECO

NECO
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The Niger State Government is in debt to the National Examinations Council, NECO, for N500 million due to student examination fees that have not been paid.

This information was provided by the examination body’s registrar, Dantani Wushishi, at the announcement of the 2022 Internal Senior Secondary Certificate Examinations results on Thursday in Minna.

 

Read Also: 5 States Are Still Owing Us Over ₦2bn – NECO Laments

‘Niger State owes about N500m as they have currently reduced their outstanding debts. The state government has assured us that it will pay and clear off the debts, ‘Wushishi said.

He stated that due to the state government’s debt, the testing organisation is withholding the results of all pupils in the state.

The registrar went on to say that in order for the state government to obtain the results, he had suggested that they separate the names of candidates who were self-supported from those who were sponsored by the government.

He added, “We have requested from the state government to try and separate the names of those the state is sponsoring and those sponsored by their parents and guardians.J

 

Jigawa State paid for all of its students registration fees this year and paid off all of its obligations. One of the most students are currently enrolled in Kano State. The state owes close to N1 billion, but this year they paid for all of the candidates to register there as well as more than 70% of the backlog they owed.

Wushishi further disclosed that, in contrast to previous years, the council saw a decrease in examination fraud during the internal SSCE in 2022.

13,595 people were arrested for malpractices in comparison to 20,003 in 2021, which indicated a noticeably lower number of malpractice cases.

He continued by saying that the council has a zero-tolerance policy for cheating and that it had proposed stripping four schools of their accreditation for two years as a result of their involvement in widespread cheating.

Wushishi added that supervisors who were disciplined for their examination-related behaviour were found wanting.

According to him, “29 supervisors were placed on the blacklist for a variety of offences, including inadequate monitoring, disrespect, and aiding and abetting during the exams.”

The registrar reported that 1,209,703 candidates had registered for the exams, but only 1,198,412 had actually taken the test.

He added that there were 727, 864 candidates—or 60.74 percent—who received five credits or more, including English Language and Mathematics.

He said, There are 1, 031 candidates with special needs, including 98 with albinism, 177 with autism, 574 with hearing impairments, and 107 with vision impairments.

 

Africa Daily News, New York

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