No Difference Between Nigerian Politicians And Prostitutes

No Difference Between Nigerian Politicians And Prostitutes
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It is often said that the route in politics is littered with broken relationships and strange bedfellows and this is why Nigerian politicians are very notorious for defecting and detaching themselves from one political party to the other like prostitutes. The politics of inter-party decamping has become a global phenomenon that no developing nation is free from. In Africa especially, Nigeria inter-party decamping has become an order of the day and this form of politics has been classified as Political nomadism (which is the nature of the game, politics without principles).
Political nomadism is self-serving as it leaves the politician without a bus stop pursuant to self-aggrandisement. At the heart of Nigerian ruling class, politics is a fundamental inability to serve the genuine interests of the Nigerian people.
Nigeria’s democracy is 22 years old since the country returned to a democratic government in May 29, 1999. Since then, there are different blocks in the wheel of the democratic system in Nigeria, which affect the country’s having a ‘true’ multiparty democracy. One of these is the party decamping. However, the problem of inter-party decamping has become a phenomenon in Nigerian politics, where some politicians are defecting from their party to another. This development is commonly referred to as inter-party decamping, party-switching, party- jumping, party-hopping, cross- carpeting, floor-crossing, canoe-jumping, decamping, etc. These terms are employed to mean the same thing as defection and this has become a perpetual attribute of the Nigerian democracy, exclusively in this President Muhammadu Buhari’s administration.
Since the 1990s Nigeria has been in the process to plan her route towards the institutionalisation of a workable democratic society as a precondition for good governance and to lay the basis for sustainable social, economic and political development. This is so because support for democratisation has mainly been used as a device to accomplish and sustain political development, for the purpose of legitimate and acceptable government and for the betterment of its citizens through democracy and governance.
Nevertheless, with the return to democracy on May 29, 1999, Nigerians jubilated with high expectations for peace, security, good governance and national development. But since then, nothing has changed because there are differences in the democratic movements in the nation, which affect the nation’s quest for a right multiparty democracy and good governance.  Through their elected representatives, political parties implement policies that reflect the ideology of the party. However, this is not the case in Nigeria. Moving from one political party to another is common and seen as a way of gaining an advantage over other political parties.

For example, Nigeria’s current president, President Muhammadu Buhari, while he was never a member of the PDP, he did move between various political parties in his quest to become the number one citizen of Nigeria. In 2003 and 2007, he contested for president as the candidate of the All Nigeria People’s Party (ANPP). In 2011, he was the presidential candidate of the Congress for Progressive Change (CPC), which he founded. And we all know what happened in 2015, he won the APC presidential primary in the Fall of 2014 and was elected president in the March 28, 2015 elections.

So why do Nigerian politicians bounce between political parties and behave like common prostitutes looking for better clients? Political parties in Nigeria, and in other parts of the African continent, tend to lack ideologies and explicit messages that separate them from each other. Because of the country’s tribal, religious and geographic divide, political parties are driven by personalities as opposed to ideologies. For example, in the United States, political parties are defined by their platforms, or manifestoes as they are called in Nigeria. So, if a Republican candidate comes knocking at your door, you have a sense of where he or she stands on the current critical issues.

In 2013, dozens of lawmakers fundamentally altered Nigeria’s political constellation as they decamped from the once all-powerful PDP to the newly-formed opposition coalition. The alliance lacked internal coherence, but its members were united in their desire to remove the PDP from power. Fast-forward five years and the defections are now happening in reverse. The APC is the one unravelling and the PDP is trying to hold together disparate strands and personalities, hoping that the objective of replacing Buhari is enough to hold the assorted whole together. Some group of politicians who defected from PDP to APC in 2015 again defected from APC back to PDP. Yet some Nigerians celebrated the defections of these ‘political prostitutes’ who have stolen their future and the future of the next generation. Are these political figures decamping or cross carpeting from one party to another for the interest of Nigerians or their selfish ends? Do they want to build a stable and sustainable democracy, or are they defecting because their demands and aspirations cannot be actualised in their original party? Politicians are perceived to always be after their selfish interests which has been riddled with greed and prejudice. They don’t have the interest of the common man at heart.

The main problem with defection is that the defector takes along with him the office he occupies by virtue of belonging to his former party. In another clime, the appropriate thing would be for decampees to resign from the offices they occupy before joining another political party. Hence, when a major political office holder decamps from his party to the the other, it becomes a huge issue which ends up affecting the entire polity. The consequences could sometime threaten democracy. It is well taken that because of the dearth of ideological direction, the politicians are simply out, looking for the platform where their perceived greed could be serviced the most; they are simply not out to give the nation any form of good leadership. It best explains the nomadic movement of politicians from one party to the other as presently being witnessed; of course, without regards for honour and integrity.
The implication of this is that the citizenry is left helpless, having discerned the lack of honour among the
politicians on the one hand and the lack of ideology in the political parties on the other. The general assumption,
therefore, is that the parties and the politicians only exist to scramble for spoils of governance; and when
mandated through electoral victories, only dispense government resources in favour of personal interest and
those of their cronies. This is the reason why Nigerians find it difficult to draw the line between one politician
and the other, one party or the other; and that after so many years of democracy, the citizenry is yet to truly reap the dividends of democratic governance.

AFRICA DAILY NEWS, NEW YORK
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